Training Program in Population Health Science

The MPC Graduate Training Program in Population Health Science trains predoctoral students to take an integrative approach to studying the ways in which biological, social, economic, spatial, and policy factors interact to shape population health over multiple time scales: a cells-to-society approach. The focus and unique identity of the MPC Pop Health Training Program is to train the next generation of population health scientists to consider the interactive effects of biological/genetic, social, economic, spatial, and policy factors on population health over multiple time scales. The program prepares doctoral students for research careers in a range of interdisciplinary population health fields.

To be eligible for this program, students must be US citizens, US noncitizen nationals, or permanent residents enrolled at the University of Minnesota in one of four doctoral degree programs: Geography, Sociology, Epidemiology, or Health Services Research, Policy & Administration.

The Predoctoral Training Program includes:

  • Disciplinary cross training and mentorship in the theory, methods, and substance of interdisciplinary population health science research
  • A program of cross training coursework in which social science students become proficient in the health sciences and vice versa
  • Professional development activities that integrate trainees across disciplines
  • Hands-on training as part of substantive and data infrastructure research projects in a vibrant and growing interdisciplinary population center
  • A 12-month living stipend and tuition remission for up to three years, conditional on performance
  • Annual financial support to attend a national professional conference

Directors and Mentors

Eligibility and How to Apply

Structure of the Three-Year Training Program

Current Population Health Trainees

This program is supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) under Award Number T32HD095134 (Warren and Osypuk, PIs).